Kelso

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The site of an old Railway Station in the South of the Mojave National Park, Kelso had few inhabitants in PreWar times, though it once had as many as 2000 residents in the 1940s, when borax and iron mines opened nearby. Gold and silver were also discovered in the nearby hills of what became known as the Kelso district. The town shrank again when the mines closed after about a decade.

After the Fall, some twelve of the Ghost Town’s 20 or so remaining buildings were occupied and the Railway Station, which is built in a Spanish “California mission” building style. and had been a Tourist Centre and restuarant, was converted into the Town Hall.

Legend says that the town was named after railroad worker John H. Kelso, whose name was placed into a hat along with two other workers to decide the name of the town. The town was built in 1905 specifically as a railroad station along the rail line between Utah and Los Angeles, originally called “Siding 16,” because of its location and nearby springs that provided abundant water.

The Kelso Mountains are located north of Kelso, the Kelso Dunes lie to the southwest, and the entire area lies within the boundary of the Mojave National Preserve.

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Joshua “Kelso” Calvert settled down here – possibly some years ago.

Update: The town was wiped out by Grimm’s Raiders in May 2035.

Kelso

The Devil's Highway utamaro010